LB & UB

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LB & UB

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While laying on your back with your knees at 45 degrees and feet planted firmly, raise your hips and open the pelvis towards the ceiling. This exercise engages the femur joints in the pelvis into external rotation. Once this functional movement is accomplished a closed chain isometric hold will activate your spinal stabilizer muscles and glute muscles to keep your back supported.

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The spine is held together by ligamentous structures central to core movement. The Iliolumbar ligament is key to engaging your legs appropriately and keeping the lowest portion of the spine expressing mobility from side to side with ease. By increasing this capacity to experience ease with this movement and others you will help reduce pain and increase your mobility.

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Find a balance point on your glute muscles and begin to work to lift your legs up and forward engaging your psoas. Keep your low back chest up right so as to approximate a V shape and then lift your arms up. This will strengthen and engage your psoas making the low back less impacted throughout the day, relying on the functional hip mobility to work through your daily activities.

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While on your stomach raise your legs up and back engaging your glutes and hips in a straight leg. This will alow your Sacro-iliac joint to engage the iliolumbar ligament that connects the bottom of the spine with the pelvis. This ligament takes on a lof of pressure and requires restrengthening to progress the low back. These extension exercises will give you the ability to engage more rotation from the low back spinal joints and allow you to feel free to engage your body athletically once again.

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Finally, your last exercise will be able to put these changes in functional movement together to bring mobility and balance to both legs so as to feel supported by both sides of your pelvis. The hip joint requires a certain degree of internal rotation that is engaged best when it is conditioned by a fully active body. Bring your arm into external rotation and challenge your foot to coordinate motion against a small yoga ball on the wall working up to 10 inches up and coming back to neutral. By working on the external rotation of the foot, you should also be feeling internal rotation of the hip. If you feel tight and restricted in the groin area this is a perfect time to engage your free hand into the space between your hip and pelvis. Squeeze and hold with each rep until you feel a release and more range of motion!

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While laying on your stomach raise your palms a few inches from the ground and push your elbows back. This exercise engages your upper and lower trapezius muscles to begin to take away the tension from your shoulders and neck. This will allow you to begin from a foundation of isometric holds that are important for the brain and body coordination.

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While positioning yourself in a kneeling position bring your arm to just below your shoulder and begin to protract and retract your scapular. In performing this exercise you will be able to isolate and specifically activate the muscles involved with scapular movement. Your Rhomboid muscles are responsible for retraction of the scapula. As you push back with your arm these muscles will activate.

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While in a quadriped position place the strong arm down firmly and remove the weaker arm and place it on your back, while turning your head to towards the weaker arm. This will engage the sternocleidomastoid in pain relief as it is responsible for turning the head same direction. By creating a closed chain with your body the neck and shoulder can begin to work each muscle in and provide pain free mobility.

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While in a push-up position place your arms firmly to the ground and do not bend your elbows as your chest goes up and down in a push up. This more advanced exercise can be performed on your knees to start. However, once you can progres to a push up position you will gain more benefits for the Serratus Anterior muscle tasked with protracting the scapula along the rib cage.

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While on your knees bring your body back onto your heals and your arms forward and bent in a triangle shape toward one another. Choose either arm to start and begin to strengthen the external rotation of the shoulder with small lifts up that don’t pull the elbow up with the movement. You will no be strengthening the entire posterior chain of movement of the shoulder!

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Finally, your last exercise will be able to put these changes in functional movement together to bring mobility and balance on both arms as they gain motion capacity from the muscles attaching at the spine and scapula. This exercise focuses on stretching the adduction and internal rotation of the shoulder. As you reach across your body, see if you can turn your head the opposite direction and place it on a yoga block. If your neck doesn’t feel ready for this go back to UB 3! If you feel your arm is catching in your armpit this is a perfect time to create a self release of the subcscapularis muscle. Turn towards your active arm and bring your other hand into your armpit to squeeze and hold for a few seconds with each stretch.

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About the teacher

Dr. Kappe

At 21, I was getting into weight lifting and in the middle of a squat I injured myself and I experienced debilitating nerve pain starting from my low back that reached down to my foot. I went to my MD, where I was given a prescription for pain medicine and physical therapy, neither of which helped to resolve my issue.

I began searching for alternatives. I had been active all my life, playing sports, running, and lifting. This injury was both physically AND emotionally debilitating. In my search for healing I found chiropractic, yoga, and barefoot running. Inspired, I decided to go to chiropractic school, I wanted to be able to help others whose lives are affected by injury.

In my clinical experiences I have found great results from training patients with therapeutic exercises that are researched to be effective at pain relief and increase in mobility. I am passionate about sharing this series as it has been essential to my recovery and that of my patients in the Bay Area.


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